Which replacement window style should I choose?

In Southwest and West Michigan, double-hung windows are most popular, followed by casements, awnings and sliding. Or you may have one or more bay, garden or bow windows.

All replacement window styles have advantages and disadvantages, and here’s some useful information to help you decide on the best replacement window style for your home.

Double-Hung

Double hung windows are the most common style in the Great Lakes region. Both sashes move vertically up and down. They tilt in for easy cleaning. Muntins are often added for a traditional architectural style.

Casement & Awning

Casement windows are side hinged, typically project out and use a roto-operator to open outward. Since the whole sash opens, casement windows provide the maximum ventilation. Awning windows project outward as a casement but are top hinged.

Sliding

Horizontal sliding windows are a type of window where the sashes bypass each other by sliding on a track. Some models allow both sashes to slide, some have one fixed and one sliding. Styles include two- or three-sash units.

Bay

A bay window allows the windows to project out past the exterior wall and include a window seat. It has a center picture window and two side flanking windows set at a 15-, 30- or 45-degree angle. Bay windows allow additional light to come into the room.

Bow

Bow windows project outward similar to bay units, but the windows are equal segments on a wide, curving base. The windows are typically fixed or casement unit. A bow window allows the most light and ventilation of any residential window style.

Garden

Garden windows get their name because they are popular for placing plants and flowers in. They project out and usually have operating flanker casements. Shelving is available and units are usually located in a kitchen or bathroom.